Last edited by Tegal
Wednesday, July 29, 2020 | History

2 edition of English place-name elements. found in the catalog.

English place-name elements.

A. H. Smith

English place-name elements.

by A. H. Smith

  • 347 Want to read
  • 40 Currently reading

Published by Cambridge University Press in Cambridge .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Pt.1: Introduction, bibliography, the elements A-IW. - Pt.2: The elements JAFN-YTRi.

SeriesEnglish Place-Name Society -- v.25-26
The Physical Object
Pagination2v.,23cm
Number of Pages23
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL18816815M

You can use the Key to search for a particular place-name, or to browse through the names of a particular county. It will provide you with a name's meaning and a break-down of the different parts of the name (its 'elements') and the language(s) of those elements. Origins of Place Names Virtually all of the place names decided on up to around the 14th Century were due to the environment of the area. For example, Doncaster would probably have originated as a Roman fort on a hill, from the Roman ' Caster ' and Celtic ' Don '.

The above mentioned elements can all be found in the Domesday Book, some more overtly, others in a form yet to be fully developed (records from the 12th and 14th century in particular seem to have chiseled out the ambiguous features of a place name, and it then became more clear whether an element stemmed from OE or ON). Place-names often reflect local, cultural, and political history. It is only natural, therefore, that words for such historically important phenomena as boundaries should form part of place-names. In England, there is a fair number of place-name elements that refer to boundaries. Some of them are treated in this thesis. They are OE (ge)mǣre, OE mearc, OE *rān, *rǣn(e), ON rein, ON rá, and Pages:

As any Scrabble player knows, dictionaries of English tend not to include entries for names—of people, organizations, or places. For the lexicographer names in general, and place names in particular, pose all kinds of problems. To begin with, a place name cannot really be defined.   Elements English place names tend to have two elements, perhaps three if they're feeling important. The last element is the important one because it tells you what the place actually was. For example, ton meant farm in Old English. So if the place name ends ton, then way back in the fogs of time it .


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English place-name elements by A. H. Smith Download PDF EPUB FB2

The toponymy of England, like the English language itself, derives from various linguistic origins. Modern interpretations are apt to be inexact: many English toponyms have been corrupted and broken down over the years, due to changes in language and culture which have caused the original meaning to be lost.

In some cases, words used in placenames are derived from languages that are extinct. English Place-Name Society: Vol English Place-Name Elements, Part 1, Introduction Bibliography The Elements A-IW maps: Introduction Bibliography the Elements A-IW Maps Pt. 1 Smith, A. ISBN ISBN Genre/Form: dictionnaire: Additional Physical Format: Online version: Smith, A.H.

(Albert Hugh), English place-name elements. Cambridge [Eng.] University. ISBN: OCLC Number: Notes: Pt. 1 Introduction, Bibliography, The elements A-IW, maps. -- Pt. 2 The elements JAFN-YIRI, index and. English Place-name Elements - 2 Volumes - Part 1 and Part 2 on *FREE* shipping on qualifying offers.

English Place-name Elements - 2 Volumes - Part 1 and Part 2Manufacturer: Cambridge University Press. English place-name elements by A. Smith; 9 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Etymology, Names, Geographical, English language, Names, Geographical Names.

The Chief Elements used in English Place Names. Being English place-name elements. book Second part of the Introduction to the Survey of English Place Names. English Place-Name Society Volume I Part II.

by Allen Mawer (Ed) and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at The A to Z entries are complemented by a detailed introductory essay discussing the chronology and development of English, Irish, Welsh, and Scottish place-names, as well as an extensive bibliography, maps of Britain showing old and new boundaries, and a glossary of common elements in accessible and up to date, this dictionary.

It is impossible to write a book of this kind without constant reference to the numerous published works on English place-names, particularly to the volumes of the English Place-Name Society and to Professor Eilert Ekwall's The Concise Oxford Dictionary of English these works the meaning suggested for each of the names is based on the evidence of the early spellings which are.

English Place- Name Elements. Part II[ Vol. 2 of 2]: Jafn- Ytri. Index and ma [Author] on *FREE* shipping on qualifying : Author. The English Place-Name Society (EPNS) is a learned society concerned with toponomastics and the toponymy of England, in other words, the study of place-names ().

Its scholars aim to explain the origin and history of the names they study, taking into account factors such as the meaning of the elements out of which they were created (which can be in languages such as Old English, or early Welsh.

English Place-Name Society: Vol English Place-Name Elements, Part 1, Introduction Bibliography the Elements A-Iw Maps by A.H. Smith 1 Ratings Author: F. Stenton. place-name elements to be published at the end of the E.P.N.S.

survey will devote considerably more space to their discussion and interpreta-tion. In this way the various linguistic strata in English toponymy will be laid open, and we shall get a much clearer picture of how much each stratum contributed towards the whole, how the morphological.

According to the headword entry in Smith's English Place-Name Elements, the first element of the place-names Ratley in Warwickshire and Roothill in Surrey is OE rot 'cheerful'.(1) This accords with the information given in the English Place-Name Survey volumes for the counties of Warwickshire and Surrey, both of which were prepared by the same trio of editors.

English Place-Name Elements Relating to Boundaries Jepson, Boel Link to publication Citation for published version (APA): Jepson, B.

English Place-Name Elements Relating to Boundaries. Centre for Languages and Literature, Lund University. General rights Unless other specific re-use rights are stated the following general rights apply:Author: Boel Jepson.

The Journal of the English Place-Name Society has been published annually since The Journal contains articles, book reviews, bibliographies, and occasionally addenda and corrigenda to the county survey volumes, along with the EPNS reports and accounts for the preceding year.

It is issued free to full and associate members of the Society. Public users are able to search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter without a subscription. Please subscribe or login to access full text content. If you have purchased a print title that contains an access token, please see the token for information about how to register your code.

English Place-Name Elements. By A. SMITH. Part I, pp. lvi+3o6; Part II, pp. viii+ (English Place-Name Soci ) Cambridge: University Press, 35s. each part. One of the earliest publications of the English Place-Name Society was a slim volume of sixty-seven pages listing the chief elements used in the formation of English.

Cornish place-name elements, Volumes English Place-Name Society Volumes of County Volumes of the Survey of English Place-Names Series Publications ; 56/57 Volume 56 of Supplementary Volume Volumes of Publications (English Place-Name Society) Author: Oliver James Padel: Edition: illustrated: Publisher: English Place-Name.

One of the least satisfactory entries in Smith's English Place-Name Elements of is for the headword laf, an Old English word defined as 'remains, what is left, a bequest'.(1) Three placename occurrences are cited, the most straightforward being Marlow in Buckinghamshire, where the first element is OE mere 'pool'.

Maps of English place-name element distribution I created these maps to complement those on pages li-lxii in The Cambridge dictionary of English place-names, by Victor Please consult a reliable reference book before drawing any conclusions.

Due to limitations of my software, only suffixes are considered. Bury St. Edmunds does not count.From an English surname that was from a place name meaning "Cyppel's people". The surname was borne by Rudyard Kipling (), a British novelist .From a surname derived from an English place name, which was in turn derived from the Old English given name WYNNSTAN.

A famous bearer was Winston Churchill (), the British prime minister during World War II. This name was also borne by the fictional Winston Smith, the protagonist in George Orwell's novel